Sonship II – Love

November 15, 2007

There is often a huge disconnection between us and loving God. We have a tough time visualizing and experiencing it.

Often I think that is the case because we cannot compare or relate it to an earthly love. What I mean by that is that we are a generation of displaced families. Our generation has seen more divorces than ever before. Even though it had a much more significant social impact in the decades previous, the emotional impact is severe. For many people, trying to imagine a loving father is well-nigh impossible!

But, we must picture ourselves sons and daughters of a loving father. We must imagine this father caring for us, loving us, holding our hand and taking us to the park. We must imagine a loving father laughing and playing with us.

This is the love that the Father has for us. This is what He wants from us; endless summer Sundays in the park.

He doesn’t need us to take out the garbage, clean the attic, make dinner and so on.

Picture instead a family where the family is eating dinner together and all talking joyfully about their day. Imagine the family, each one loving and responsible, cleaning off the table together. Picture yourself, the son or daughter, taking the dishes while Dad takes out the trash and mom clears the table and puts the ingredients away. Each one happy, satisfied and looking around to make sure everything is taken care of.

This is the relationship that God wants with us.

The Father wants us chatting away with Him and breaking bread. The Father wants us to do the praying and tending to the Body while He takes out the trash and handles the increase. Each of us, Him and us, are happy, satisfied and looking around to make sure everything is taken care of.

We are looking to serve because we just overflow with love and joy and appreciation for our Divine Family.

That is the love of a Father and a son. There is much more than this to His love without a doubt. We could speak of the gifts He wishes to give and the things He wishes to do through us.

Instead, I have offered this illustration to begin to bridge the disconnect we have with loving God. The next time you wonder what loving God is like, start with the mental pictures above.

It will help loosen your imagination and open your mind to what He desires of us!

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Obedience IV: Obedience is EVERYTHING

November 13, 2007

To read the whole article on Obedience is Everything, go here.


Sonship I – Leading Questions

November 13, 2007

“Who Am I?”
“Why am I here?”

All people ask these questions throughout their life. You could even argue that these are the base motivating factor behind most actions that people take.

Christians even ask these questions. The difference about people of faith is they know that the answers lie with the Divine.

“Who am I?” can only be answered by God. Therefore the question then jumps to, “Well, who is God?” “Why am I here?” With the Divine, the question changes to, “God, what do you desire of me?”

(These questions are not separate questions but a line of reason that each person makes, but we will address that some other time.)

An interesting thought is this: who is being asked these questions? When a person asks “who am I”, they are obviously asking someone. Knowing innately that no other human can answer this question, the inquirer usually turns within. The only legitimate person they can ask is their creator.

“Who Am I”

The answer to these questions seem very complex, hard to understand, and unreachable. And they probably are, for those who do not believe in God. (Everything gets pretty complex when you take Him out of the equation!)

“Who am I” can be wrought with so many rational perils. Yet, the tone of the question is that of a child. It is the question that a 4 year old asks his parents.

It is the question of a son.

“Who Am I”

It has been said many times that to understand the purpose of a creation, simply ask the creator. This is true, yet we have distorted the understanding of this phrase.

The concept of creator has been for me that of a divine toy-maker, whittling marionettes for Christmas toys. That is one of the images that come to mind. The other is that of a set of clay encrusted hands at the potting wheel, aged with wisdom and precision.

Though these may be an accurate metaphors for the Creator of men, a recent revelation hit me. Forgive me if this sounds simple. It is. (The most profound revelations I have had of late have all been profoundly simple. I guess God has need of speaking to me in my native tongue: simplemindedness!)

“Who am I” is the question from a son to a father; not an inventor and a creation. A son is a creation of a father in a very real way.

The problem with the modern view of this ephemeral ‘creator’ is that of one far, distant and unknowable. I present for your consideration that this view is skewed.

I declare to you that when we turn to our ‘creator’ for understanding who we are, we are not asking a disconnected inventor. To ask a disconnected tinkerer who we are would be to receive a certain set of antiseptic answers.

But if we see that question as a question from a son to a father, then a new set of potential answers arises. A more tangible, loving set of answers present themselves. To know our purpose by asking a father is knowable. It is not unreachable.

“Who Is He”

The lost secrets and mysteries of the Christian walk are very simple. They are so simple that people overlook them.

To know who we are, we have to know that we are sons (or daughter).
We need to know what it means to be a son.
We need to know who our father is, because his DNA is in us.
We need to know what position we have as a son.
We need to know what trade our father is in, because it will be our trade.
We need to know the tendencies of our father, because they will be our tendencies.
When people know us, they will know our father.

This is true anywhere you look. If you are reading this, you are a son or daughter. Even if your family has been scattered by divorce (as my family has), you STILL obtain half of your DNA from each of your parents.

Your tendencies, actions, decisions, and both cute and ugly quirks most likely come from both of your parents. The best way to get to know yourself is to get to know your parents once again.

“Who Am I”

You are your father. You are in Him and He is in you. He knows where you came from. He knows where you are going. He knows your purpose.

To be able to listen as a son, receive as a son, and understand as a son, we need to understand what it is to BE a son.

As soon as we can understand what it means to be a son, we will know who we are because we will know who created us. We will know what Divine DNA we carry and what to expect because of it.

So, let us explore being the offspring of the Divine!


Obedience Series

November 5, 2007

For the continuation of the Obedience series, tune into grantnieddu.blogspot.com.

I will be posting it there. Cheers!


Obedience IV: Obedience is EVERYTHING

November 1, 2007

To read the whole article on Obedience is Everything, go here.


Obedience III: The Little Things

November 1, 2007

The Little ThingsThe start of obedience is obeying in the little things.

Thank you, Captain Obvious.

Look, how to identify the little things is a major stumbling block for many Christians. How do we become sensitive and respond to God’s instructions for the little things?

To be honest, many of us are looking to the horizon for an answer to a problem. All the while God has placed the answer in your heart. You would know this if you had a) gotten quiet, and b) listened. Now is just the part of implementation: obedience.

We know it takes great faith to be a missionary or heal people.
We know it takes great faith to move mountains.
We know it takes great faith to speak in tongues or prophesy.

But, when was the last time that you heard God tell you to do one of these things? It is rare for Him to do so. (For the record, I believe that entire lives should be full of the miraculous.)

I bet the more likely case is that if I were to ask you the last thing that God asked of you, you would tell me that it was a small thing. And I bet you struggled to complete it.

I sure did! I told the truth a day or so ago when I mentioned that God wanted me to just walk over and tell a girl I did not know that God loved her. To this moment I regret it.

What next thing would God have asked of me were I to have been, and continued to be, obedient in that little thing?

Compared to preaching to millions, as Rhinehart Bonnke does in Africa, crossing the room to say 3 words (‘God loves you’) is EASY! Yet, I was not faithful in that little thing. (Wait a minutes, isn’t that the type of thing I have been praying that God would ask of me? If not that, then what?!)

And I am not talking about “small beginnings. Despise not small beginnings.” I am talking about our habit of hearing God for small things is what leads us to hear Him for big things. If we are not sensitive enough to hear Him, believe it was Him, and obey Him for the tiniest of acts, we are definitely going to doubt that “inner voice” when He asks us to do freaky things.

If you look at 1st Corinthians 13:1-4, you get a great depiction of the difference between big and little things.

You will quickly recognize this passage as “The Love Chapter”; that chapter about love.

What does love have to do with obedience, Grant?

If you look at verse 4 of this chapter, you get this:

Love is patient; love is kind; love is not envious or boastful or arrogant…

It goes on. Again, you are familiar with this chapter, I am sure. (If not, open your local Bible and read it twice!) The point is that to say that being loving is being patient, you are seeing the ‘little things’ in action.

How often has a distressed wife, about to leave her husband, exclaim “He doesn’t do the little things”? How often has a husband felt the same way?

Often, when the little things are being done, love is nearby.
When a husband encourages his wife for her success instead of envying her, love is nearby.
When a man buys groceries for the poor guy on the corner, love is nearby.

When we are bold enough to do the little things, the things we know we ought to even without a voice from heaven, we are experiencing love; as God defines it.

That is perhaps why Mother Teresa is known as the Saint of Small Things (her canonization is not official yet). She was full of loving acts. Her loving acts, an accumulation of many small things, are what make us marvel at the degree of her obedience to God.

Find the courage to do the little things today that He is asking of you. It may be uncomfortable. It may put you out, but there is nothing more important that implementing obedience that on the littlest of things. Only when we live a life of little things, will God call us to be obedient in the big.