Community and Context

June 18, 2009

Our brains cannot feel pain. They cannot, in fact, feel anything. It is pure objectivity for ourselves.

Though we can feel our body, it is usually in the context of pain only; when some invasion into the system occurs we can feel it. However, a large degree of that same objectivity expands to encompass our bodies. Sometimes, that objectivity can even include our mirror reflections.

However, show us a picture of any particular body part or a video of us moving and we experience extreme disassociation. We have all had the experience of hearing our own recorded voice and not recognizing it.

Sitting here typing, my tapping fingers are a part of me, but I do not experience them in the way I would experience another’s tapping my arm.

This experience causes us to not know ourselves. We all ask “who am I” and “why am I here”. These are questions that result from our inability to experience ourselves.

In searching for God, in searching for relationships, in joining gangs and cults, we are searching to answers these questions. We were created to not experience ourselves, which means we seek to gain context.

The thing about context is that it is about location AND meaning. Whenever we find false identity, we find it in these two things.

Our purpose and our place (in both space AND time) satisfy this.

With community, especially CHRISTIAN community, we gain context by the person sitting across from us. That person is not only an immediate answer to location and purpose (they are looking at us and our service to them gives us great purpose). They represent God in the Body, eternally confirming location and purpose; our divine purpose in the intended location He placed us.

We not only need the Body for ephemeral reasons. We need the community for psychological affirmation. We need the Body to affirm what we suspect God has for us. The community gives us context.


Florida Revival Photos and Pictures

May 7, 2008

Todd Bentley praying in the Holy Ghost during the Florida Revival in Lakeland, Florida at the Lakeland Center.Here they are, as promised, the Florida Revival Photos and Pictures. You can find them on the Florida Revival Photos page, which will lead you to a Flickr.com.

This is truly a Media Revival by the Holy Spirit, as God.tv has been covering it almost every night, the news media has been visiting the revival, along with web 2.0 and social marketing sites are covering every inch of the miracles and outpouring of the Holy Ghost.

Revivalists such as Terry Kruse, Paul Cain, Bobby Conner, and many others are able to be involved with this move of God due to the power of the internet and television.

Check out our photos. Submit your own to photos@christiancrunch.com.


Hey, Jude, Are You Even A Book In the Bible?

October 23, 2007

Why do these guys always look down?Jude. Jude. I had to think just to remember where that was? Oh, yeah, one of the obscure ones just before Revelation.

Someone had inquired of me about the word ‘rebuke’ in Jude verse 9. (Yes, it is such a short book/letter of the Bible that they decided against even using chapters!)

In Jude 9 it is written: “Yet, Michael the archangel, when contending with the devil he distputed about the body of Moses, dared not bring against him a railing accusation, but said, The Lord Rebuke thee.” (KJV.)

So, I checked the Strong’s reference for ‘rebuke.’ Now, there are plenty of other Greek words that have been translated into “rebuke”. I will just stick to this one real quick.

Because the word was ‘Epitimao’, I assumed that it had something to do with being removed from the center (‘epi’ being the Greek preposition often used with regards to the center.)

Well, being wrong has never bothered me before, and being wrong here was more enlightening than anything.

The two root words, epi + timao, carry something a little different here. It is as if to say, “I will let the Lord affix your value”, or “Let the Lord decide on your value (with a negative assumption to imply that He will find your value as very little and cast you off)”.

Now, I know that the latter is quite a leap, but when you look at the two words they really carry this sort of meaning. (That is, without an exhaustive study on the tone of the actual Greek.)

I found it quite interesting that the word would be translated as ‘rebuke’ in this one instance. Why would it not be translated “The Lord judge you” or “Let the Lord judge your worth”? I will leave the intense study to the scholars.

For now I will take from this brief study the knowledge that it is the Lord who should estimate one’s value. Even the archangel felt that it was not his place. We can leave the same critique of those around us to God, and seek Him for the value of others around us.

After all, who would want to judge the value of another, only to be “rebuked” by the Lord?!


Holy vs. Common; Clean vs. Unclean.

October 18, 2007

“They are to teach my people to difference between the holy and the common and show them how to distinguish between the unclean and the clean.”

Ezekiel 44:23 

In Ezekiel 44, we find that he is having another wacky vision. (Crazy prophets, huh?)

Here, though, he hits on something really profound. As Christians, we know that we are a holy priesthood (Exodus 19:6). We know that we are to be set apart in all of our ways.

So are we? Do our lives show the people around the difference of the holy and the common? Is there a difference from the way you do business and the way others do business? Is there a difference from the way you treat your family than the way others do? Do we live in a way that others can better distinguish between the unclean and the clean?

Thought for the day: observe yourself throughout the day.

Look for whether or not your life is really that much different than the life of those around you. Ask yourself if you are living in a way that illustrates to the people around you the difference between the holy and the common; the clean and the unclean.